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GO K i AT H i, defines "eve r yon e!"

  

THESE ARE THE DROIDS YOU ARE LOOKING FOR
 

THESE ARE PEOPLE
 

PERSON v. PHONE
 

blessing in disguise (plural blessings in disguise)
  1. (idiomatic) A seeming misfortune that turns out to be for the best.
In modern society, the proverb "blood is thicker than water" is used to imply that family relationships are always more important than friends.
The equivalent proverb in German (originally: Blut ist dicker als Wasser), first appeared in a different form in the medieval German beast epic Reinhart Fuchs (c. 1180; English: Reynard the Fox) by Heinrich der Glîchezære. The 13th-century Heidelberg manuscript reads in part, "ouch hoer ich sagen, das sippe blůt von wazzere niht verdirbet" (lines 265-266). In English we read, "I also hear it said, kin-blood is not spoiled by water."

Authors Albert Jack[5] and R. Richard Pustelniak[6] claim the original meaning of the expression was that the ties between people who've made a blood covenant were stronger than ties formed by "the water of the womb". However, no known historical sources predating the modern era contain the blood-covenant version of the expression.

The use of the word "blood" to refer to kin or familial relations has roots dating back to Greek and Roman traditions.[7]. This usage of the term was common in the English-speaking world at least as early as the mid 1300s. Because English speakers around that time would have understood the word "blood" as referring to family, it is likely that the use of "blood" in the expression "blood is thicker than water" would also have been understood by English speakers referring to family.

Although not specifically related to the expression "blood is thicker than water", H.C. Trumbull notes an interesting comparison of blood and milk in the Arab world:

" We, in the West, are accustomed to say that "blood is thicker than water" ; but the Arabs have the idea that blood is thicker than milk, than a mother's milk. With them, any two children nourished at the same breast are called "milk-brothers," or "sucking brothers"; and the tie between such is very strong. [..] But the Arabs hold that brothers in the covenant of blood are closer than brothers at a common breast; that those who have tasted each other's blood are in a surer covenant than those who have tasted the same milk together ; that "blood-lickers," as the blood-brothers are sometimes called, are more truly one than "milk-brothers," or "sucking brothers"; that, indeed, blood is thicker than milk, as well as thicker than water.[8] "

More recently, Aldous Huxley's Ninth Philosopher's Song (1920) approached the proverb differently, stating, "Blood, as all men know, than water's thicker / But water's wider, thank the Lord, than blood."[9]
"Blood is thicker than water" is:
"Thicker than water" is:
BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WATER

1. Water into blood (דָם): Ex. 7:14–24[edit]

This is what the LORD says: By this you will know that I am the LORD: With the staff that is in my hands I will strike the water of the Nile, and it will be changed into blood. The fish in the Nile will die, and the river will stink and the Egyptians will not be able to drink its water.
— Exodus 7:17–18
Nu (also Nenu, Nunu, Nun), feminine Naunet (also Nunut, Nuit, Nent, Nunet), is the deification of the primordial wateryabyss in the Hermopolitan Ogdoad cosmogony of ancient Egyptian religion. The name is paralleled with nen "inactivity" in a play of words in, "I raised them up from out of the watery mass [nu], out of inactivity [nen]". The name has also been compared Coptic noun "abyss; deep".[1]
Nut is also the name of the sky goddess of the Ennead of Heliopolis.
The name is spelled phonetically with the nw hieroglyph 
W24
 (may be repeated three times), with the determiners "sky
N1
 and waters
N35A
 . An alternative phonetic spelling used the phonogram nn 
M22 M22
 . [2]
Joshua /ˈɒʃuə/ or Jehoshua (Hebrewיְהוֹשֻׁעַ‎ Yĕhôshúʿa; Aramaicܝܫܘܥ‎‎ IshoGreekἸησοῦςArabicيوشع بن نون‎‎ Yashuaʿ ibn NūnLatinIosueTurkishYuşa) is the central figure in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Joshua. According to the books of ExodusNumbers and Joshua, he was Moses' assistant and became the leader of the Israelite tribes after the death of Moses.[3] His name was Hoshe'a (הוֹשֵׁעַ) the son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, but Moses called him Yehoshu'a (יְהוֹשֻעַ; Joshua in English) (Numbers 13:16), the name by which he is commonly known. The name is shortened to Yeshua in Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:17). According to the Bible he was born in Egypt prior to the Exodus.[2]

Mary is a feminine given name, the English form of the name Maria, which was in turn a Latin form of the Greek names Μαριάμ (Mariam) and Μαρία (Maria), found in the New Testament. Both variants reflect Syro-Aramaic Maryam, itself a variant of the Hebrew name מִרְיָם or Miryam.[1]
mar mf (plural mares)
  1. sea (body of water)
The men or ah (/məˈnɔːrə/Hebrewמְנוֹרָה‎‎ [mənoːˈɾaː]) is described in the Bible as the seven-lamp (six branches) ancient Hebrew lampstand made of pure gold and used in the portable sanctuary set up by Moses in the wilderness and later in the Temple in Jerusalem. Fresh olive oil of the purest quality was burned daily to light its lamps. The menorah has been a symbol of Judaismsince ancient times and is the emblem on the coat of arms of the modern state of Israel.

Allah (/ˈæləˈɑːləəlˈlɑː/;[1][2] Arabicالله‎, translit. Allāh‎, pronounced [ɑɫ'ɫɑːh]) is the Arabic word for God in Abrahamic religions. In the English language, the word generally refers to God in Islam.[3][4][5] The word is thought to be derived by contraction from al-ilāh, which means "the god", and is related to El and Elohim, the Hebrew words for God.[6][7]

Rebekah) (HebrewרִבְקָהModern RivkáTiberian Riḇqā ISO 259-3 Ribqa,(Assyrianː ܪܲܦܩܵܐː Rapqa) from the Hebrew ribhqeh (lit., "connection"), from Semitic root r-b-q, "to tie, couple or join",[1] "to secure", or "to snare")[2] appears in the Hebrew Bible as the wife of Isaac and the mother of Jacob and Esau. Rebecca and Isaac were one of the four couples believed to be buried in the Cave of the Patriarchs, the other three being Adam and EveAbraham anSarah, and Jacob and Leah.[3]

The Shekhina(h) (also spelled Shekina(h)Schechina(h), or Shechina(h)) (Biblical Hebrewשכינה‎‎) is the English transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning "dwelling" or "settling" and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God. The Shekhinah is the feminine aspect of Divinity, also referred to as the Divine Presence. [1]:231

This term does not occur in the Bible, and is from rabbinic literature.[2]:148[3][4]

Shekhinah is derived from the Hebrew verb שכן.[need quotation to verify] The Semitic root means "to settle, inhabit, or dwell". This abstract noun is not present in the Bible, and is first encountered in rabbinic literature.[2]:148–149, [3] The root word is often used to refer to birds' nesting and nests. ("Every fowl dwells near its kind and man near his equal.")[5] and can also mean "neighbor" ("If two Tobiahs appeared, one of whom was a neighbour and the other a scholar, the scholar is to be given precedence."[6]

Eve (/ˈiːv/Hebrewחַוָּה‎, Classical HebrewḤawwāh, in Aramaean and Modern Israeli HebrewChavahArabicحَوَّاء‎, translit. Ḥawwā'‎, Syriac: ܚܘܐ) is a figure in the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible. According to the creation myth[1] of the Abrahamic religions, she was the first woman. In Islamic tradition, Eve is known as Adam's wife and the first woman although she is not specifically named in the Quran.

According to the second chapter of Genesis, Eve was created by God (Yahweh) by taking her from the rib[2] of Adam, to be Adam's companion. She succumbs to the serpent's temptation to eat the forbidden fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. She shares the fruit with Adam, and as a result the first humans are expelled from the Garden of Eden. Christian churches differ on how they view both Adam and Eve's disobedience to God (often called the fall of man), and to the consequences that those actions had on the rest of humanity. Christian and Jewish teachings sometimes hold Adam (the first man) and Eve to a different level of responsibility for the fall, although Islamic teaching holds both equally responsible.

Although Eve is not a saint's name, the traditional name day of Adam and Eve has been celebrated on December 24

From Middle English aren, from Old English earunearon ("are"), reinforced by Old Norse plural forms in er- (displacing alternative Old English sind and bēoþ), from Proto-Germanic {{m|gem-pro|*arun||(they) are", from Proto-Germanic *esi/*izi (a form of Proto-Germanic *wesaną ("to be")), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti ("is"). Cognate with Old Norse erun ("(they) are"; > Icelandic eru ("(they) are"), Swedish är ("(they) are"), Danish er ("(they) are"))Old English eart("(thou) art"). More at art.

Hey Zeus! (stylized as hey Zeus!) is the seventh and last studio album by X. Its tracks "Country at War" and "New Life" peaked at numbers 15 and 26 on the Billboard Modern Rock charts, respectively.

Elyon (Biblical Hebrew עליוןMasoretic ʿElyōn) is an epithet of the God of the Israelites in the Hebrew BibleʾĒl ʿElyōn is usually rendered in English as "God Most High", and similarly in the Septuagint as "Ο ΘΕΟΣ Ο ΥΨΙΣΤΟΣ" ("God the highest").
Revelation 7 is the seventh chapter of the Book of Revelation or the Apocalypse of John in the New Testament of the ChristianBible.[1][2] The book is traditionally attributed to John the Apostle.[3][4]


 great multitude stand before the Throne of God, who come out of the Great Tribulation, clothed with robes made "white in the blood of the Lamb" and having palm branches in their hands. (7:9–17)
The Marriage Supper of the Lamb
  1. A great multitude praises God. (19:1–6)
  2. The marriage Supper of the Lamb. (19:7–10)
Blood of Christ in Christian theology refers to (a) the physical blood actually shed by Jesus Christ primarily on the Cross, and the salvation which Christianity teaches was accomplished thereby; and (b) the sacramental blood present in the Eucharist or Lord's Supper, which is considered by CatholicOrthodoxAnglican, and Lutheran Christians to be the same blood of Christ shed on the Cross.

The Roman Catholic ChurchEastern Orthodox churches, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Assyrian Church of the East, and Lutherans, together with some Anglicans, believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. The Roman Catholic Church uses the term "Transubstantiation" to describe the change of the bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ. Eastern Orthodox too have authoritatively used the same term to describe the change, as in The Longer Catechism of The Orthodox, Catholic, Eastern Church[1] and in the decrees of the 1672 Synod of Jerusalem.[2

The New Heaven and Earth, and New Jerusalem
  1. A new, glorious Heaven replaces the old Earth. There is no more suffering or death. (21:1–8)
  2. God comes to dwell with humanity in the New Jerusalem. (21:2–8)
  3. Description of the New Jerusalem. (21:9–27) 


Seventh Heaven or 7th Heaven is a state of euphoria. It may also refer to:
In religious or mythological cosmology, the seven heavens refer to the seven divisions of the Heaven, the abode of immortal beings, or the visible sky, the expanse containing the SunMoon and the stars.[1] This concept dates back to ancient Mesopotamian religions and can be found in the Abrahamic religions such as IslamJudaismand Christianity, a similar concept is also found in some Indian religions such as Hinduism.[2] Some of these traditions, including Jainism, also have a concept of seven earths or seven underworlds.

The cross-cultural focus on the number seven may correspond to the seven classical planets: the MoonMercuryVenus, the SunMarsJupiter, and Saturn. These were the only objects in the sky visible to ancient astronomers (who had no telescopes) that move in predictable, repeated patterns (in contrast to comets) against the daily rotation of the fixed stars.

 The seventh heaven, which borrows some concepts from its Jewish counterpart, is depicted as being composed of divine light incomprehensible to the mortal man. Abraham is a resident of the seventh heaven.[12]According to some hadiths, the highest level of Jannah is firdaws,[13] and Sidrat al-Muntaha, a Lote tree, marks the end of the seventh heaven.

In the Second Book of EnochEnoch travels through the seven heavens and gives geographical and visual documentation of them, describing houses, olive oil and flowers. He passes through the Garden of Eden in the Third Heaven on his way to meet the Lord in the 7th Heaven.[17]

The notion of seven heavens may have been derived from the "magical" properties of the number seven, like the seven demons or the seven thrones. The number seven appears frequently in Babylonian magical rituals.[6] The seven Jewish and the seven Islamic heavens may have had their origin in Babylonian astronomy.[1]

S WORD

  
medusa.reallyhim.com

Excalibur, or Caliburn, is the legendary sword of King Arthur, sometimes also attributed with magical powers or associated with the rightful sovereignty of Great Britain. Sometimes Excalibur and the Sword in the Stone (the proof of Arthur's lineage) are said to be the same weapon, but in most versions they are considered separate. Excalibur was associated with the Arthurian legend very early. In Welsh, it is called Caledfwlch; in CornishCalesvol; in BretonKaledvoulc'h; and in LatinCaliburnus.

The name Excalibur ultimately comes from the Welsh Caledfwlch (and Breton Kaledvoulc'hMiddle Cornish Calesvol) which is a compound of caled "hard" and bwlch "breach, cleft".[1] 

 
In Arthurian romance, a number of explanations are given for Arthur's possession of Excalibur. In Robert de Boron's Merlin, the first tale to mention the "sword in the stone" motif, Arthur obtained the British throne by pulling a sword from an anvil sitting atop a stone that appeared in a churchyard on Christmas Eve.[12][note 1] In this account, the act could not be performed except by "the true king," meaning the divinely appointed king or true heir of Uther Pendragon. This sword is thought by many to be the famous Excalibur, and its identity is made explicit in the later Prose Merlin, part of the Lancelot-Grail cycle.[13] This version also appears in the 1938 Arthurian novel The Sword in the Stone by British author T. H. White, and the Disney adaptation. They both quote the line from Thomas Malory in the 15th century; "Whoso Pulleth Out This Sword of this Stone and Anvil, is Rightwise King Born of all England".[14] The challenge of drawing a sword from a stone also appears in the Arthurian legends of Galahad, whose achievement of the task indicates that he is destined to find the Holy Grail
In The Holy Kabbalah (Arthur Edward Waite, 255), Samael is described as the "severity of God", and is listed as fifth of the archangels of the world of Briah. Samael then became the consort of Adam's first wife, Lilith. Lilith is a demon created alongside Adam, originally created for the role Eve would fill. Samael created with her a host of demon children, including a son, the "Sword of Samael"[9] (or Asmodai).[10]
The Amduat[pronunciation?] (literally "That Which Is In the Afterworld", also translated as "Text of the Hidden Chamber Which is in the Underworld" and "Book of What is in the Underworld")[1] In the sixth hour the most significant event in the underworld occurs. The ba (or soul) of Ra unites with his own body, or alternatively with the ba of Osiris within the circle formed by the mehen serpent. This event is the point at which the sun begins its regeneration; it is a moment of great significance, but also danger, as beyond it in hour 7 the adversary Apep (Apophis) lies in wait and has to be subdued by the magic of Isis, and the strength of Set assisted by Serqet. Once this has been done the sun god opens the doors of the tomb in hour 8 and then leaves the sandy island of Sokar by rowing vigorously back into the waters in hour 9. In hour 10 the regeneration process continues through immersion in the waters until in hour 11 the god's eyes (a symbol for his health and well being) are fully regenerated. In hour 12 he enters the eastern horizon ready to rise again as the new day's sun.

Shadow of the Hegemon (2001) is the second novel in the Ender's Shadow series (often called the Bean Quartet) by Orson Scott Card. It is also the sixth novel in the Ender's Game series. It is told mostly from the point of view of Bean, a largely peripheral character in the original novel Ender's Game but the central protagonist of the parallel narrative Ender's Shadow.Shadow of the Hegemon was nominated for a Locus Award in 2002.[1]

BereshitBereishitBereishisB'reshithBeresheet, or Bereishees (בְּרֵאשִׁית‎ – Hebrew for "in the beginning," the first word in the parashah) is the first weekly Torah portion (פָּרָשָׁה‎, parashah) in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading. The parashah consists of Genesis 1:1–6:8. The parashah is made up of 7,235 Hebrew letters, 1,931 Hebrew words, and 146 verses, and can occupy about 241 lines in a Torah Scroll (סֵפֶר תּוֹרָה‎, Sefer Torah).[1]


Inline image 6
Inline image 5 jerusalem.reallyhim.com 
Inline image 13

STONE 

Saul and the Israelites are facing the Philistines in the Valley of Elah. Twice a day for 40 days, morning and evening, Goliath, the champion of the Philistines, comes out between the lines and challenges the Israelites to send out a champion of their own to decide the outcome in single combat, but Saul is afraid. David, bringing food for his elder brothers, hears that Goliath had defied the armies of God and of the reward from Saul to the one that defeats him, and accepts the challenge. Saul reluctantly agrees and offers his armor, which David declines, taking only his staff, sling (Hebrewקָלַ֗ע‎‎ qāla') and five stones from a brook.

  
David and Goliath confront each other, Goliath with his armor and javelin, David with his staff and sling. "The Philistine cursed David by his gods", but David replies: "This day the LORD will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you down; and I will give the dead bodies of the host of the Philistines this day to the birds of the air and to the wild beasts of the earth; that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel, and that all this assembly may know that God saves not with sword and spear; for the battle is God's, and he will give you into our hand."

David hurls a stone from his sling and hits Goliath in the center of his forehead, Goliath falls on his face to the ground, and David cuts off his head. The Philistines flee and are pursued by the Israelites "as far as Gath and the gates of Ekron". David puts the armor of Goliath in his own tent and takes the head to Jerusalem, and Saul sends Abner to bring the boy to him. The king asks whose son he is, and David answers, "I am the son of your servant Jesse the Bethlehemite."



In Greek mythology Medusa (/məˈdjzəməˈ-, -sə/US: /məˈd-/; Μέδουσα "guardian, protectress")[1] was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as a winged human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazers upon her hideous face would turn to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto,[2] though the author Hyginus makes her the daughter of Gorgon and Ceto.[3] According to Hesiod and Aeschylus, she lived and died on an island named Sarpedon, somewhere near Cisthene. The 2nd-century BCE novelist Dionysios Skytobrachion puts her somewhere in Libya, where Herodotus had said the Berbers originated her myth, as part of their religion.

Medusa was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head, which retained its ability to turn onlookers to stone, as a weapon[4] until he gave it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. In classical antiquity the image of the head of Medusa appeared in the evil-averting device known as the Gorgoneion.

The New International Version translates the passage as:
"I baptize you with water for repentance.
But after me will come one who is more
powerful than I, whose sandals I am not
fit to carry. He will baptize you
with the Holy Spirit and with fire.
For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 3:11

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